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Charter Schools Education Education Reform Special Education Success Academy

Successes and Failures of Success Academy.

Successes and Failures of Success Academy.

Any great school has its successes and failures.  I’m not saying we need to pick on everything that happens in every school, but when something does happen, we can’t stay quiet.

Full Disclosure.

I root for Success Academy like its no one’s business. As a charter school leader who wouldn’t? They boast some of the highest test scores in the state. For Black and LatinX parents, Success presents a strong argument that kids in the inner city are just as good if not better than affluent neighborhoods throughout the state of New York. I even send my teachers to their campuses every year as a part of their professional development. My thought process behind sending teachers to Success Academies to observe is, please don’t tell me Black and LatinoX students can’t achieve when we see it first hand that they can.

Eva as the Face of the Charter Movement.

Eva Moskowitz’s methods almost take away from everything that Success has accomplished. We can say, when you’re a top school, people are going to “gun” for you. I don’t buy this argument because other high performing charter schools manage to stay under the radar. Those charter schools aren’t as politically connected and don’t have a CEO that calls the mayor out every other week. Like it or not, Eva Moskowitz is the public face of the charter school movement.

The Current Controversy.

At current, Success Academy is embattled in a special education Civil Rights Violation scandal. In a complaint filed with the NY State Education Department, SA allegedly changed IEP’s without parent knowledge. If you know anything about the special education process, you know parents are an essential component and deciding determiner of the outcomes of IEP meetings. The mere thought of a school changing an IEP is implausible. In my mind and heart, I hope that there is a counter-narrative to explain these actions.

The Coverage.

All things being equal, I would not say I like writing bad things about charter schools. Charter schools already face an uphill battle contending with the anti-choice animus. However, if viewed as having an inability to police, and call out our own, that’s nothing short of hypocrisy. If we’re doing something wrong, it should be everyone’s business to call it out and offer suggestions as to how to improve things.

My Suggestion.

The work going on in the charter sector is too important for there to be one face. Eva is a constant target for charter school pundits. SA’s network is enormous and has a ton of talent. It may be time for the schools’ leaders to step into the forefront and be the faces of SA.

Eva’s work is too valuable on the grand scale of things, for her to continue to be the face of the organization. My advice would be to yield to the school leaders.

Moving the Work of Charter Schools Forward.

We have to call a spade a spade. If someone in the sector, no matter who it is, albeit CMO or Single-site charter is doing something wrong, we must all voice concerns. To remain silent is to stay complacent. I understand some of you are walking on eggshells. It’s okay if I lose followers or supporters for speaking about what’s right, those people were not the kind of folks that should be following me.

Categories
Charter Schools Education Education Reform Politics School Choice Teachers

SUNY’s Controversial Plan

SUNY’s Controversial Plan to Allows Charters to Certify Teachers:

Firstly, SUNY is a nationally recognized charter school authorizer from NY state. SUNY recently made headlines for approving a new, innovative approach by allowing its high-performing charter schools to certify their teachers. Some Charter schools experience hard times staffing their schools with highly qualified staff. Consequently, teacher turnover rates are higher than in traditional public schools.

According to a study on teacher turnover conducted on charter and public school teachers in Los Angeles, determined that charter school teachers leave at a 33% higher rate than teachers at traditional public schools.

The Nay-Sayers

Generally speaking, as a school leader in public charter schools, I have always operated under the mantra that no teacher education program was created equal. We would have some first-year teachers that were extremely prepared for the classroom.  We have others that are less prepared to take over a class. It comes as no surprise that colleges and universities are not in favor of this new teacher certification initiative.

Not to mention, universities lose a ton of money if potential teachers no longer obtained Master’s degrees in education. I am not sure what the world of education would do if out of touch college and university professors lost their soapboxes, and had to move away from the theory component of teacher training. Imagine if they had to deal with the complexities of the practice component of training teachers. One of the most significant takeaways from my teacher education program was, in theory, everything works.  However, in practice, well that is a different story.


NYSUT:

Moreover, another major player in opposing SUNY charters to certify their teachers is the state’s largest teachers’ union. Those familiar with NYSUT should not be surprised by their stance. Anything anti-establishment in my opinion usually draws ire from NYSUT. I am not sure if NYSUT is upset because they did not have a say in the process. Maybe this is just legal posturing. It could be their usual malcontent for anything charter school related.

It’s Never Really About the Students:

Lastly, and most importantly, what about the Scholars? Success Academy, and other top performing charter schools that will have the honor of certifying their teachers. Success Academies have knocked the ball out of the park with their performance on NY State assessments. If I were a teacher, training under schools that have a proven formula for success (no pun intended) would entice me.  I would choose this over a dreadful undergraduate program that doesn’t prepare you for teaching.

Notwithstanding, how will this benefit the scholars? Having an in-house training program will allow charters to build teacher capacity and stamina for the work. Two of the top five reasons teachers leave charter schools are lack of administrator support and job security. Charter schools would be more invested in keeping staff that they have trained from the ground up. Plus, it is a lot easier to hold charter school’s accountable for staff attrition if they are certifying their teachers. We all want teacher turnover to decrease, and that will undoubtedly benefit scholars.


RCS #PuertoRicoStrong Initiative

My opinion is that I like the idea.  However, I want to love the idea. Having a clear and transparent record keeping of staff attrition is helpful.  There would need to be a way to monitor teachers who leave after they are certified.  Possibly only allowing these teachers to transfer to other SUNY endorsed schools.