Category Archives: African American History

The Edupurist Podcast

The “Edupurists” Podcast.

 (Click this link for the new podcast) 

The Edupurist Podcast focuses on education in its purest form, the truth. The Edupurist podcast will shed light on the many issues that affect Black/Brown families. Each episode will focus on changing the narrative by using education as a catalyst for change. The goal is to shed light and love while being super critical of a system that not necessarily designed to uplift Black/Brown students.

8 Black hands Conglomerate.

So, many of you have heard the crew and me on the 8 Black Hands Podcast. The 8 Black hands podcast is when we come together to form Black Voltron in the podcast space. However, currently, we are all in the development stages for our podcast efforts. We will continue to record our 8 Black Hands podcast, but to give you more content, we decided to host individual podcasts under the 8 Black Hands umbrella. So, look out for six other hands and their podcasts coming real soon.

Episode 1- When the See Us.

A lot has been made about the new Netflix series When They See Us. Ava DuVernay did a fantastic job of bringing this to life. The way that she was able to bring truth power speaks volume about her talent. DuVernay is a national treasure, and we should celebrate her as such.

Guest(s).

In this episode, we have two guests. Mr. Terrell Dozier, Dean of Students and Families at the Riverhead Charter School. We also have Mr. Khari Shabazz, a Principal in the Success Academy Network. I was honored to be able to “chop” it up with these fellas regarding pertinent issues that benefit Black/Brown families.

Cinematic Importance.

These performances were as real as it gets. It doesn’t or probably will never bring justice to this situation, but there was power in these portrayals. When thinking about these performances, one person comes to mind; Korey Wise. The actor that played Korey Wise deserves all of the accolades that come with this type of production. He did a fantastic job, P-E-R-I-O-D-T.

Oprah Interview.

Oprah recently had the cast members of “When they see Us” and the Central Park Five. As well she had the victims of the injustice. This interview was powerful and deserved a listen. Below is a clip from the conversation. Kudos to Oprah for bringing much-needed attention to this injustice.

The Ray(s) vs. Everybody Podcast

An Educator’s Sacrifice.

As educators, we tend to give a lot to our students. So much, in fact, I know many educators that neglect their own children due to the demands of the career. I have felt victim to that many times. Feeling disconnected from your child’s life is not a good feeling at all. This feeling got me to thinking, how can I help others while still keeping a pulse on what my teenager is doing. It was there I thought of The Ray(s) vs. Everybody Podcast.

Falling Prey to the System.

Black and Latinx boys have become prey to a system that does not prepare adequately to become men. Some would even say that the system not only sets them up for failure but it’s making them ready for prison. I needed to come up with a way to advance the culture while not allowing my own son to become a victim to the system.

A New Type of Podcast.

We have decided to theme this podcast on Black and Latinx culture while keeping the focus on uplifting black boys through emphasizing education. My son is an expert on most things culture. I’m taking a back seat and asking questions parents should ask while maintaining a safe space for a Black male teenager to navigate through his feelings while being expressive about the things he doesn’t understand. The most exciting part of this podcast is the fact that I’m learning from my son the expert.

The Ray(s) Vs. Everybody Podcast.

In the first episode of The Ray(s) vs. Everybody Podcast, we talk about Kodak Black and his current media backlash. Ray Jr. comes into his own as a voice for teenagers growing up in the United States post-Obama. It’s vital that we give our young Black and Latinx teenagers an outlet to express themselves. There’s no better way to do that than to meet them on technological platforms that peak their interests while creating a safe space for them to be expressive.

Bridgebuilder.

I hope that this podcast serves as a bridge between Black and Latinx boys and the male figures in their lives.  I think The Ray(s) vs. Everybody Podcast can be transformational in terms of forming a better dialogue between Black and Latinx males.

Black Folks Y’all Are on Your Own!

Origination of Black Folks Y’all Are on Your Own!

I can’t take total credit for this. The title of this blog post was actually an underlying theme of the 8blackhands podcast. Dr. Cole, our esteemed “podmate” has been saying this for a while. It seems as though with everything that we discuss in education, Black Folks Y’all are on your own!

What this means is, people will do their damnedest to point out to you that a problem exists in education, but little to no effort will go into providing you with solutions on how to navigate through the nuances of the said problem.

The More Things Change.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. If I were to ask an old-timer, do you think that things have changed from the Civil Rights Movement? I guess that 8/10 would say yes.

The tenor in the country is lighter, there are fewer forms of public violence against minorities, but are we looking at things from the correct lens?

Let’s Analyze the picture to the left of the screen. I’d like to pay particular attention to the Black Incarceration data set. We all can concede that Black and Latinx folks are overly criminalized in American society.

There are at least two Democratic nominees for President that are vying for the presidency based on criminal justice reform. They identified the problem, “Black Incarceration,” and they created a platform to change it, “criminal justice reform.” It seems simple enough. But I definitely won’t hold my breath for the outcome.

When will Educating Black Kids Change?

Another problem that we have identified is Black and Latinx students are failing in K-12 education in the United States. It’s actually quite awful how much they have fallen behind their counterparts.

Meanwhile, racism and prejudice continue to permeate the discourse in determining why? In the NYC debate over how to better integrate its specialized high schools, Asian parents have established a campaign in which they are saying “Black and Latinx parents don’t care about their child’s education.” When asked to provide proof of such, and I was advised to go to any NYC library.

I was then told that in the library you’d find Asian kids studying, but you wouldn’t find black kids doing the same. Therefore it was equated that “Blacks and Latinx folks don’t care about their children’s education.

Navigating Through the Nuance.

We’ve established that Black Folks are on their own in K-12 education. Rather than walk you through the solutions of how to navigate through the nuance, I’ve decided to make this blog interactive.

If you have ideas as to how to solve the educational woes from Black and Brown folks, we want to hear your solutions. You can reach out to us @8Blackhands1 on twitter. Tonight’s episode, we will talk in debt with Dr. Cole about: Black Folks Y’all are on your own! So stay tuned.

The Day We Cape for a Quality Education for PoC; Instead of Caping for Jussie and the likes. ‘No Cap’

Eight Million:

If we could “Cape” for our students of color the way we “cape” for actors and athletes, 8 million students would be better off.

Imagine a world where we advocate for the education of the poor and disenfranchised, No Cap.

There are Eight million students of color, currently receiving less than adequate instruction in the United States. The areas most affected are centralized ‘urban cities’ or port cities. Please name me a port town where students of color are performing well academically. A port town where unemployment is equal to suburbia and crime is at a minimum. If you can find such a city, I will stop blogging.

Poor Jussie:

Moreover, we have enough to worry about in current day society. By in large, 400 years of physical and psychological trauma, enter Jussie Smollett, or Jamal as you Empire watchers like to call him. Immediately we took him at his word when he said the attack occurred. Any black male that questioned the attack risked accusal of exhibiting “Toxic Masculinity.”

Toxic Masculinity:

fullsizeoutput_15a9Toxic masculinity, in theory, can’t be every time black males do not agree with the mainstream. Currently, it is over usage diminishes its value. Overall, there was nothing toxic about feeling like this story was “fake news.” People continue to remain silent, hoping that the results matched Smollett’s account. That story is now in question. We will continue to see how it plays out in the media.

Democratic Cap(ers):

Every major Democratic politician admonished the alleged assault against Smollett. Most if not all are very quiet as details surface around this being a staged attack. It is all the more reason for us to rechannel our energy.

Notwithstanding, this is more of a reason to make these candidates focus on issues that matter to us. In essence, if this were true, and Smollett experienced an assault. I would want nothing more than his attackers to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. However, if he is found to be “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” celebrity aside, Smollett deserves prosecution to the fullest extent of the law.

Lets Rep for These Eight Million Kids:

On the other hand, what’s not in question is the eight million students of color that are still in failing schools. Factually speaking, with teacher strikes are on the rise, and teachers’ unions complex strategies to pit traditional public schools against public charter schools. We have to fight for our kids.

In closing, let’s “Cape” for our kids the way that we “Cape” for these celebrities on TV. Our kids need us, and it’s time for us to take a stand, ‘No cap.’

My blog: EverybodyluvsRaymondsedblog.com

Podcast: https://audioboom.com/posts/7177506-blackface-black-history-and-black-education

Twitter: @Mr_Ankrum; @8blackhands1

Virginia is for Lovers!

Virginia is for Lovers:

I’ve always operated under the assumption that Virginia was for lovers. I never really felt the love in the state. I always felt like at any time it could “go down” in Virginia.

Don’t get me wrong; waterpark U.S.A. is fantastic. Virginia Universities are some of the best in the nation. The love of pork is reminiscent of slave times, but I digress.


Virginia is for Lovers of Blackface:

I mean, I get it, who wouldn’t want to be a part of a culture as dope as this. Black culture is amazing. Most outside of the culture fail to understand its meaning and its impact.

Many folks outside the culture want in, “By Any Means Necessary.” Some go through some amazing feats to implant themselves in Black Culture. We have almost every white Virginia politician outwardly saying through artistic expression, “they think Black culture is superior.” Why else would they dress up in blackface? I know they aren’t racist. Certainly not in 2019.

Virginia is for Lovers of Forcing the Issue with Women:

These allegations against Lt. Governor Fairfax are all in a fact-finding stage. So, we don’t want to assume that these incidents occurred automatically. For now, we’ll say “allegedly.” However, I’ve learned where there is smoke, often there is also fire. Democrats continue to put on the façade that they are morally superior to Republicans by asking Dems to step down from office. Meanwhile, Steve King (R) from Iowa continues to “flourish.” This moral high road, albeit admirable, isn’t winning Democrats any new voters.

Virginia is for Lovers of Racism:

The cradle of racism lies in Virginia. The countless stories of Virginia State troopers pulling black people over at a disproportionate rate. Moreover, then we have Charlottesville. Not to mention, these folks celebrate Robert E. Lee, and Confederate statues like the South won the Civil War.

Virginia, of this, is what your love is all about, Y’all can “hold that.”

Black History: Every *GD* Month

Black History: Every *GD* Month

This time of year is always hard for me.  February is Black History Month, and I don’t celebrate it.  It’s not because I don’t embrace my history. And it’s certainly not that I’m not grateful for the 28 days, sometimes 29 days that we’ve been given to celebrate.  I don’t celebrate Black History Month because I know the truth.  The truth is, there would be no American History without African American History.

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So, rather than celebrate them month that has been allotted, I celebrate African American History every day. February is just another month for me to continue doing what I always do, embrace the energy of our ancestors, with the hopes of one day making them proud.

If you are celebrating African American History, do it in a culturally responsive manner.  As you embrace the present, do not ever forget what it took for us to get to this point.  Do not forget about the trauma that may still exist.  This trauma should never be undervalued.


Energy in the Classroom:

Moreover, as a former classroom teacher, one can empathize with the struggles experienced by K-12 teachers.  There are tons of extraneous factors that play into how successful one may be in the classroom.  These factors are heightened when teachers are placed in Urban school districts, forced to deal with students that have been inherently disenfranchised, and suffer from systemic trauma.  Some of the trauma associated with our students dates back to over 400 years to slavery.

Anti-Trauma:

Notwithstanding, there are people that will be unapologetically against the notion that slavery plays a part in common-day trauma.  To those people one asks, were you forced out of your country, shipped to a foreign land and made to work for free? Did you read books designed to lead you to salvation galvanized to trick you into thinking what occurred during slavery was your destiny?  Did people feed you food high in sodium, which in turn made most of your race susceptible to cardiovascular disease?  Were your women raped?  Have you been separated from your family? Did times exist when you’d rather die than to be living in your current circumstance?


If the answer to these questions is no, I’d highly suggest you take a seat.

If the answer to your question is no, but you’d like to learn more about how to best help my students that carry this hurt and pain, pay close attention, because it’s a mindset.


Here are some ways to better engage African American parents in February and beyond:

1. Black folks don’t want your handouts. We just want to be recognized as 5/5ths a person. That’s right, a Whole person.
2. We don’t want you to feel sorry for us, we want you to teach us. I don’t know a more straightforward way to put this.
3. Treat us like you are preparing us for college, and not prison.
4. Engage with parents like they are allies and not enemies. PoC want what’s best for their children.